Ray Lab

Introduction

Genetic variation in the human genome controls a compendium of cellular and physiological components that make up human biology. The Ray Lab is interested in better understanding how genetic variation tunes our immune system and how this can put individuals at risk for autoimmune diseases, which is a vital step in developing more effective therapeutics with fewer side effects. 

Because most genetic risk for autoimmune diseases occurs in non-coding regions of the genome, the Ray lab studies how non-coding genetic variants modulate cis-regulatory regions and alter immune cell activities that lead to autoimmune disease susceptibility. We prioritize likely disease-causal variants and cis-regulatory regions, and, in human and mouse systems, identify variant target genes and pathways and define their functional effects on immune cells.

These studies will inform efforts for personalized therapies and disease prevention.

Ray Lab Inline - Group Photo
John Ray
Assistant Member

John Ray, PhD

Principal Investigator, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
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Lab Members

Max Dippel

Maxwell Dippel, MS

Research Technician, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
Alex Ho

Alex Ho, PhD

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
Lucy Li

Lucy Li

MCB Graduate Student, Hamerman Lab & Ray Lab; Center for Fundamental Immunology; UW Medical Scientist Training Program
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Meghan McQuade

Meghan McQuade

Research Technician, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
Leann Nguyen

LeAnn Nguyen, PhD

PostDoctoral Researcher, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
Bio Cole Pugliano

Cole Pugliano

Rotation Student, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
Amelia Querbach

Amelia Querbach

Lab Aide, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology
Bio Stephanie Ryder

Stephanie Ryder

Research Technician, Ray Lab; Center for Systems Immunology